Working in Partnership to Advance the Health and Well Being of the Black Community More
If we cross the river together, the alligators won’t bother us. African Proverb More
When we treat people EQUALLY we ignore differences… More
When we treat people EQUITABLY we respect differences. More
It is more important to know the person who has the disease, than what disease the person has. More

Adinkra Symbol:
"Help me and let me help you."
Cooperation and Interdependence.

OUR HEALTH MATTERS

We want your opinion.
What’s the most important health issue facing the Black community today?
Complete the Our Health Matters Survey so we can compile, analyse and report the results.

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COMMUNITY HEALTH WATCH

The Black Health Alliance will be participating in the 7th Annual Black Diabetes Expo on Saturday April 23, 2016. Support or Join the BHA Board of Directors as they hop, skip and run at the Jamaican Canadian Association Walk Good Walk-A-Thon on May 1, 2016.
For more Community Health Events follow the link.

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Get Involved

BHA welcomes new members, individual or organizations to assist in the work of the Alliance. For more information on how you can join the BHA follow the link below.
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WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP TO ADVANCE THE HEALTH AND WELL BEING OF THE BLACK COMMUNITY

The Black Health Alliance (BHA) is a registered Canadian Charitable Organization consisting of community organizations, health and social service professionals, and community members working in partnership to advance the health and well-being of the Black community. The Black Health Alliance engages in community based health research, health promotion and education, development of culturally competent programs, and public policy and best practices.
Black Health Alliance member organizations include African and Caribbean Diabetes Prevention and Heart Heath Initiative, Africans in Partnership Against AIDS, Black Coalition for AIDS Prevention (Black CAP),

Caribbean Chapter of the Canadian Diabetes Association, Sickle Cell Association of Ontario, Sickle Cell Awareness Group of Ontario, Substance Abuse Program for African Canadian and Caribbean Youth (a program of CAMH), TAIBU Community Health Centre, The Olive Branch of Hope, The Walnut Foundation, Women’s Health in Women’s Hands.
Collectively, the Black Health Alliance, through its membership serves tens of thousands of individuals and families from the diverse Black communities in Ontario.